Saturday, October 19, 2013

Bill Williams Mountain Trail, Williams, Arizona

The perfect days of a Northern Arizona autumn are here, yet I am reflecting upon one of my favorite summer hikes. When the temperatures rise in Ash Fork, I take the boy up to Williams, where it's 5-10 degrees cooler, with a lot more shade. Bill Williams Mountain Trail #21, is the main trailhead located at the Williams Ranger Station. Several other trails can be accessed from it, including Clover Spring and City of Williams Link Trail. Bill Williams Mountain is a great day hike, though there are some fairly steep patches on the way up. For a beginning to intermediate hiker, this will just mean a few extra rest stops and a reminder that the return trip is all downhill. 

This trail wanders through ponderosa pines, oak, aspen and fir, with a bit of rock climbing thrown in. Well, not actually climbing, but for a 10 year old boy, we call it that. There are dozens of small dens to observe, most will be empty during the day, but have caution lest you come upon a sleeping critter or a new mother with her litter. Several viewpoints offer a glimpse of the town of Williams. You will likely hear the train whistle at some point, if you make the entire 6 mile round trip. The Grand Canyon Railway leaves Williams for the Canyon at 9:30a.m. and returns at 5:45p.m. daily.

The reward at the top of the trail is the Bill Williams Lookout tower, still occasionally manned by the Forest Service. If you're lucky, maybe you'll get invited up to take in the spectacular view, as a friend of mine did. One thing this same friend mentioned is that it is also possible to drive to the top on Forest Road 111, so if hiking is not for you, or if you just want to make the one way trip, you can still enjoy the mountain.

Though the trail is very clear, we still saw a few of these marking tapes (pink ribbon on the tree) along the way, hmm...
The yellow plate on this tree identifies it as a "bearing tree", a part of the Public Lands Survey System, identifying land boundaries and locations long before the GPS was even conceived.

As you can see here, Yak is carrying his walking stick. We don't always use them, but they are very helpful. He's also got water and gatorade easily accessible from the outside pockets of his daypack. Inside, I happen to know, are an apple, chips, a granola bar and a camera, notebook and pen. He also has a hoodie and hat stowed in there. Even if you think you're just going on a short hike, it's a good idea to be prepared. You never know what's up around the bend...

Happy Trails!

If you enjoyed this post you might enjoy these:

Clover Spring Trail, Williams, Arizona

No comments: